Public Acknowledgements of Alcoholism and Alcohol Recovery Programs


Alcoholism Treatment ProgramsIt seems to happen on an almost weekly basis. We, the public, are exposed to a heartfelt confession from some star or former star acknowledging his or her alcoholism. Another public figure discusses losing a family member or loved one to the disease. For some it can seem like tabloid fodder and exploitation but to others it is an acknowledgment that they are not alone. Getting people into alcoholism treatment programs is difficult work, often because people fear the stigma attached to such efforts. The more out in the open we can be about these issues the better chance people have of addressing these issues.

So when I see articles like Representative Paul Ryan opening up about losing his alcoholic father or child actor Alison Porter(best known for the 1991 movie Curly Sue), I think that if it allows even a handful of people to address their demons it is a good thing. These days finding an alcohol recovery program is easy but folks need to first understand that they have a problem. Even the most functional of alcoholics could benefit from facing the issue head on. As they hear of successful people coping with the disease and its fallout it becomes a lot easier to see what they may be. That understanding can start the long march towards healing.

A New Article Again Highlights the Language of Addiction and Addiction Treatment


Addiction TreatmentA few weeks back we talked about how language can be particularly stigmatizing to people attempting to address issues of addiction of any kind. Now a new editorial in the journal Substance Abuse is discussing those same concerns that we shared. The article by Lauren M. Broyles suggests that phrases such as “addicts” and “junkies” can actually do a lot of harm to people trying to get help for their behavioral health issues.

The article suggests that when words like those mentioned above are used it can undermine people’s recovery. The concern is that these words lay the blame for a person’s behavior wholly at the feet of the person struggling with addiction. Other words discussed in the article are commonly used euphemisms like “clean” or “dirty” when discussing drug testing.

While the article does not suggest eradicating these words from the language of recovery altogether it does strongly caution everyone involved to read signals and understand how their words might be affecting a patient. The important thing to remember is that drug and alcohol addiction are illnesses that should be handled as such. Rather than placing the blame on someone in an alcoholism treatment program or drug rehab, you should be applauding their efforts to get an addiction under control.

What Robin Williams’ Death Says About Addiction Treatment and Depression


Alcoholism Treatment ProgramRobin Williams’ death last week, of an apparent suicide, highlighted several issues near and dear to our hearts as behavioral health advisors. Williams had, through years of endearing himself in the hearts and minds of millions, struggled long and hard with addiction. He went through drug treatment programs, alcoholism treatment programs, and everything that tends to come along with them but in the end it all came up short in one key way. The depression that was at the heart of his addictions was not fully addressed.

While no one can fully guarantee the success of an addiction treatment program we are more equipped than ever to address not just the surface issues but their source. Each year newer more personalized variations on old treatment methods come up. As a culture we are better at dealing with addiction and depression than ever before, yet we still sometimes come up short.

The important takeaway is that there are resources to get you out of addiction and depression. Sometimes making the call is hard but it is always worth it. Had someone been given the chance Robin Williams might still be alive today. Before you do anything drastic give us the chance to help.

Are You a Functional Alcoholic?


Alcohol Recovery Program

So called “Functional Alcoholics” by most statistical standards make up the majority of alcoholics in the country. These are people you see every day who may never betray on the outer surface the signs of a serious problem drinker. They go to work, have outwardly beautiful home lives, and seem to be living a perfect life. On the inside though the excessive drinking that defines their lives is still taking a toll, on their health, on their quality of life, on their family.

While identifying an a high functioning alcoholic might prove difficult, these addicts frequently excel at creating a double life around their addictions, finding them help is easier than ever. Utilizing intervention services can help family and loved ones strategize their plan for getting a loved one help. There are a wide array of alcoholism treatment programs that are specially made for these so called functional alcoholics. They can help make the scope of an addiction clearer while also offering a route towards recovery.

If you or someone you know might be a functional alcoholic a quick conversation with our staff of behavioral health advisors might be in order. We can help identify if you truly do have a problem and begin to build a plan for treating it.