A New Article Again Highlights the Language of Addiction and Addiction Treatment


Addiction TreatmentA few weeks back we talked about how language can be particularly stigmatizing to people attempting to address issues of addiction of any kind. Now a new editorial in the journal Substance Abuse is discussing those same concerns that we shared. The article by Lauren M. Broyles suggests that phrases such as “addicts” and “junkies” can actually do a lot of harm to people trying to get help for their behavioral health issues.

The article suggests that when words like those mentioned above are used it can undermine people’s recovery. The concern is that these words lay the blame for a person’s behavior wholly at the feet of the person struggling with addiction. Other words discussed in the article are commonly used euphemisms like “clean” or “dirty” when discussing drug testing.

While the article does not suggest eradicating these words from the language of recovery altogether it does strongly caution everyone involved to read signals and understand how their words might be affecting a patient. The important thing to remember is that drug and alcohol addiction are illnesses that should be handled as such. Rather than placing the blame on someone in an alcoholism treatment program or drug rehab, you should be applauding their efforts to get an addiction under control.

What Robin Williams’ Death Says About Addiction Treatment and Depression


Alcoholism Treatment ProgramRobin Williams’ death last week, of an apparent suicide, highlighted several issues near and dear to our hearts as behavioral health advisors. Williams had, through years of endearing himself in the hearts and minds of millions, struggled long and hard with addiction. He went through drug treatment programs, alcoholism treatment programs, and everything that tends to come along with them but in the end it all came up short in one key way. The depression that was at the heart of his addictions was not fully addressed.

While no one can fully guarantee the success of an addiction treatment program we are more equipped than ever to address not just the surface issues but their source. Each year newer more personalized variations on old treatment methods come up. As a culture we are better at dealing with addiction and depression than ever before, yet we still sometimes come up short.

The important takeaway is that there are resources to get you out of addiction and depression. Sometimes making the call is hard but it is always worth it. Had someone been given the chance Robin Williams might still be alive today. Before you do anything drastic give us the chance to help.

Are You a Functional Alcoholic?


Alcohol Recovery Program

So called “Functional Alcoholics” by most statistical standards make up the majority of alcoholics in the country. These are people you see every day who may never betray on the outer surface the signs of a serious problem drinker. They go to work, have outwardly beautiful home lives, and seem to be living a perfect life. On the inside though the excessive drinking that defines their lives is still taking a toll, on their health, on their quality of life, on their family.

While identifying an a high functioning alcoholic might prove difficult, these addicts frequently excel at creating a double life around their addictions, finding them help is easier than ever. Utilizing intervention services can help family and loved ones strategize their plan for getting a loved one help. There are a wide array of alcoholism treatment programs that are specially made for these so called functional alcoholics. They can help make the scope of an addiction clearer while also offering a route towards recovery.

If you or someone you know might be a functional alcoholic a quick conversation with our staff of behavioral health advisors might be in order. We can help identify if you truly do have a problem and begin to build a plan for treating it.

Behavioral Health Advisors Understanding Addiction


Behavioral Health AdvisorsOne of the lucky breaks of working in substance abuse recovery circa 2014 is our understanding of addiction is deeper than it has ever been. We now understand the nature of addiction more than ever before. We also know how an addiction progresses from experimentation to a full blown problem. It is this understanding that has helped us develop a more effective form of addiction treatment. This understanding has also underscored just how vulnerable everyone is to becoming an addict.

For people of all types, across cultural and class lines, addiction starts as denial. The first time someone takes an addictive substance they tell themselves that they will not succumb to an addiction. From that moment on the person has put themselves at risk of submitting to addictive behaviors while rationalizing them each step of the way.

Once the addiction starts to take hold people set parameters for use, “only on the weekends,” “not while the kids are awake,” “after work.” Those lines blur and soon you have an addiction, though you still might not see it as such.

By understanding the mentality that leads to addiction, and the fact that we are all vulnerable to it, we have found ways to bring those dealing with addiction around to understanding their problems. As a result experts and behavioral health advisors have built better methods for effective recovery.